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. >> the president swore an oath to uphold the constitution, and he is bound by the law. whether the lethal force in question is a drone strike or a gunshot, the law and the constitution apply in the same way. >> brown: and this afternoon, attorney general holder sent paul a new letter. in it, he said: senator paul declared himself satisfied with that answer. >> so, i am very pleased to have gotten this response back from the attorney general of the united states, and i think that americans should see this battle that we've had in the last 24 hours as something that's good for the country. >> brown: shortly thereafter, the senate ended the debate and confirmed john brennan. now, we examine what's behind the senate shenanigans, politically and practically. we are joined by: scott shane, a national security reporter at the "new york times"; and niels lesniewski, who covers the senate for "roll call." is it took a while, but in the end the president got his nominee. briefly remind us about john brennan's experience. clearly someone well known at the agency he'll head. >> john brennan spent 25 years
of the nation's strictest abortion law in arkansas, where nearly all procedures will have to be done in the first 12 weeks of pregnancy. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: another key seat in president obama's national security team was filled today. the senate approved a new leader for the central intelligence agency, but not before a war of words over unmanned aircraft and presidential power. >> the nomination is confirmed. >> brown: john brennan was confirmed as the c.i.a.'s next director 63-34 after a drama- filled 24 hours.
california's law, i didn't feel like that was something that this administration could avoid. i felt it was important for us to articulate what i believe and what this administration stands for. >> sreenivasan: 200 congressional democrats also filed a brief today urging the court to overturn the california ban. they join more than 100 prominent republicans who voiced their support earlier in the week. the justices will hear oral arguments in late march. a federal judge in california has cut a $1 billion damage award in the apple-samsung fight by nearly half. samsung will now have to pay apple just under $600 million for infringing on smart phone and tablet computer patents. the judge also ordered a new trial on some of apple's allegations in the case. wall street ended the week with small gains. the dow jones industrial average added 35 points to close at 14,089. the nasdaq rose nine points to close at 3,169. for the week, both the dow and the nasdaq gained a fraction of a percent. february was a good month for most major auto makers in the u.s. ford reported today its sales rose 9%
,000 people without power. the state of arkansas will now have the most restrictive abortion law in the country. republicans dominating the legislature overrode a gubernatorial veto today. the new law includes a near-ban on abortions after the 12th week of pregnancy. it's slated to take effect this summer, but a court challenge is certain. a small group of u.s. senators today filibustered the nomination of john brennan to be director of the c.i.a. they focused on whether the government would ever use drone aircraft to attack americans, inside the u.s. kentucky republican rand paul cited a letter from attorney general eric holder. it said drone strikes on u.s. soil might be considered in an extraordinary circumstance, such as 9/11. paul said he's alarmed. >> you can't take away someone's life and liberty without due process or an indictment. so it should trouble every american. i can't imagine that there wouldn't be an american in our country that would not be troubled that we're talking about killing non combatants in american with drone strikes. >> several other republicans join
to continue at the same levels, yes sequestration is still the law of the land but we're not going to rely on these broad -- they call them meat ax cuts. troop levels get this much funding, border security gets this much funding, democrats want to say we're going to put money into head start. we're going to put some money into education programs or transportation. grabbing their authority back from what they see as the broad cuts of sequestration. >> suarez: people may be sitting at home listening to what you just said and think "i've seen this movie before." there's just over three weeks until the sand runs through the hour glass and the republicans in the house and the democrats and the senate look like they're going to come up with different versions of that continuing resolution. then what? >> it's a game of ping-pong is what we call it on capitol hill. the old idea of the house passes a version, the senate passes a version, they gate conversation committee together and work it out. that's dead for now. there's no capacity for a conference. what's going to happen is the house is going
examines the charges against sulaiman abu ghaith, an al qaeda spokesman and son-in-law to osama bin laden, who appeared in a new york court today. >> suarez: from caracas, matt frei of "independent television news" reports on the state funeral for venezuelan president hugo chavez, attended by dignitaries from more than 50 nations. >> this feels less like a funeral and more like a celebration of immortality. the government has taken the decision not to bury him, but to embalm chavez, and keep him lying in state forever. >> brown: david brooks and ruth marcus analyze the week's news. >> suarez: and we close with a writer's reflections on the earthquake and tsunami that hit japan two years ago. >> i felt the need to go, and it's been this lifelong thing about japan that has called me. i wanted to hear the stories. i wanted to help people. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnee lled "real and permant go." celebratin
preacher, al qaeda follower and son-in-law to osama bin laden. he allegedly appeared with bin laden, the day after the 9/11 attacks. urging muslims to attack christians, jews and americans and a short time later, he gave this speech. >> ( translated ): the storm of planes will not stop. there are thousands of young muslims who desire martyrdom in the path of allah. >> warner: federal prosecutors say in 2002, abu ghaith left afghanistan for iran, where he's lived since. then, last month, he traveled to ankara, turkey, only to be detained and deported to kuwait. but during a stopover in amman, jordan, he was nabbed by u.s. authorities. and flown to new york to face charges in federal court. that move drew criticism from some republicans, who argued that terror suspects should be tried by military tribunals at guantanamo bay, cuba. senator lindsey graham, of south carolina: >> you're putting people like this into federal court, giving them the same constitutional rights as an american citizens. >> warner: similar objections in 2010 forced attorney general eric holder to back down from
needs to do is simply follow the law and protect public health by curbing carbon pollution. the good news here is that clean energy in obama's second term is a lot cheaper than it was in his first term. the price of solar has dropped by almost 70%. the price of wind continues to decline. so much so that in 2012, solar and wind combined made up 58% of the new capacity that was added to the grid last year. so what we're seeing is that clean energy can take up more of the burden in terms of our energy demand than coal and gas and nuclear power can. so, the rule-making that scott was referring to, the burden to make that rule actually stick is a lot lower than it used to be. of course, we always know that clean energy creates more jobs. at the same time that it cuts carbon pollution. the great news here is that we can have a win-win saiment. >> ifill: do you expect a big change? >> i don't expect a tremendous amount of change but the one thing that i believe will come even sharper into focus in the second term is that when i... you know, when i first came to washington and even at the be
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)